Archive for the ‘Lyme Disease’ Category

It is predicted that this year there will be an increase of about 21% in Lyme Disease in the U.S. due to a growth in acorn production. Believe it or not there is definitely a relationship between acorns and Lyme Disease. Acorns are consumed by white-footed mice that often carry the blacklegged ticks and act as vectors for Lyme Disease. It is expected for Lyme Disease rates to be particularly high in the summer because the ticks are in their nymphal stage so they are harder to spot, meaning they could stay on the host for a longer period of time.

LymeDiseaseIf you believe that you are showing any symptoms or signs of Lyme Disease it is important that you speak to your physician and get tested. You may order a Lyme Disease blood test on our website www.healthonelabs.com for $89.99.


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Lyme disease is transmitted to humans by blacklegged ticks that are infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.

black legged tickA few characteristic symptoms that you may experience if you have Lyme Disease are headache, fatigue, fever, and a rash called erythema migrans. The rash will look similar to a bull’s-eye and a lot of the time the rash will spread in a circular pattern with a lighter center and darker outer ring. Lyme Disease should be treated immediately otherwise the infection could spread to the nervous system, heart, and joints. Most cases can be treated with antibiotics if diagnosed on time. If you believe you may have Lyme disease or have been exposed to blacklegged ticks, it is important that you get tested as soon as possible. Lyme Disease Antibodies with reflex testing is offered on our website at https://www.healthonelabs.com/ for $139.75. Remember that it is possible for the test to come back negative during the early stages of Lyme Disease even if the rash is apparent. In this case you should speak to your physician and possibly get retested.

For more information, see the CDC website.


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