Posts Tagged ‘diabetes’

There have been debates about the negative effects dairy can have on health, and one of the most common topics is whether the type of fat found in foods with dairy cause an increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Dairy products are high in fat, specifically in saturated fat, which is a major contributor to obesity. On the other hand, many believe that certain dairy products such as fermented yogurt actually may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes or at least not have an effect on the risk of developing it. Dieticians recommend limiting saturated fat intake by 10% of the total amount of calories consumed, which is about 20 grams of saturated fat per day for the majority of people. To put this into perspective, a single ounce of cheese has about 8 grams of saturated fat. Studies performed to see if there is a connection between dairy and diabetes have been inconclusive because they don’t take into account the types of dairy people are consuming.However, results from several studies do indicate that low-fat dairy consumption has a slight decrease in risk for type 2 diabetes. Specifically, it was found that a quality, low-fat, fermented yogurt was the most beneficial. The other side of dairy proponents say that quality full-fat dairy products like cream, yogurt, and cheese lower type 2 diabetes risk. A study from Framingham Heart Offspring found that those who consumed low-fat and high-fat dairy products reduced risk of prediabetes by 25%-39%. While studies like this did find these results, it is still not clear what dairy products are the best. Due to this unclarity, the dietary guidelines for dairy consumption say that 3 servings per day of low-fat or fat-free dairy products, especially fermented yogurts like kefir, are optimal.

dairy image


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Childhood obesity can prevent physicians from being able to properly interpret their routine blood tests. Studies have found that 24 routine blood tests can be affected by obesity, including:

  • inflammation markers,
  • iron,
  • lipids, and
  • liver function.

Researchers evaluated 35 routine biochemical markers in serum samples like iron, magnesium, calcium, uric acid, phosphorus, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. They converted waist circumference, BMI, and sex specific z-scores and grouped the children in normal-weight, overweight, and obese categories. The study found that 13 out of the 35 biochemical markers were different among different BMI categories. Some of these included GGT, cardio C-reactive protein, iron, transferrin, and HDL cholesterol. Waist circumference and BMI were related to serum concentration of 24 out of 35 markers. The most noticeable difference found among the various BMI’s was the uric acid results. The average among both males and females was 237 μmol/L, 261 μmol/L, and 270 μmol/L in normal weight, overweight, and obese. Research suggests that this may be due to immoderate adiposity is related to uric acid levels in a healthy population of kids, so it is important this be taken into account for obese kids. It is important for physicians to take this into account when interpreting routine lab results because they are often used for clinical decisions based off of a range derived from a healthy population. It is unknown whether childhood obesity is a marker for early disease, but it should definitely be taken into account when interpreting blood test results, as 70% of blood tests can be affected by obesity.

blood test checklist


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There is a strong connection between diabetes and your vision health.  If you have prediabetes or diabetes Diabetes and Eye Health it is important to get your blood glucose levels under control.  According to the American Diabetes Association, individuals with diabetes have a higher risk of blindness than those without diabetes and are 40 percent more likely to have glaucoma and 60percent more likely to have cataracts.  Those statistics are staggering and we must protect the gift of sight.

Online Blood Tests

There are various types of retinal damage that can be caused by diabetes.  This is typically referred to as diabetic retinopathy.  If you have chronic blood glucose levels (high blood sugar), the tiny blood vessels that supply needed blood to your retina in your eye get damaged, which causes them to be unable to function properly.  Lack of blood supply to the retina can eventually lead to vision loss.  Furthermore, your body may trigger the growth of new blood vessels, in order to compensate for the damaged blood vessels, which in turn can rupture and leak blood.  In the end, these blood vessels can cause retinal detachment or glaucoma.

The longer you have had the diagnosis of diabetes increases your likelihood of getting retinopathy.  If your blood sugar is not under control, the likelihood of complications increases considerably.

The two common symptoms are blurry vision dark floating spots. it is important you see your ophthalmologist every six months if you are diabetic.  Additionally, it is crucial that you manage your blood sugar levels.  Many diabetics will check their blood sugar levels at home, but be sure to see if you are managing those levels by getting a Hemoglobin A1c test which is a way to find out your average blood sugar levels over time.

Some discount blood lab tests to consider:

Or order our Diabetes test package for an economical way to get all the tests above plus additional screening tests to be sure your organs are not affected by high blood glucose levels.


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What is Glycemic Index?

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Glycemic index(GI) is a scale from 0 to 100 that ranks carbs on how they will affect your glucose levels. Similarly, glycemic load(GL) tells you how much carbs you are eating based on the GI value and quantity of carbs in a meal. A high value of consumed GI carbs is absorbed and digested faster thus, spiking your glucose levels right after eating said food, and then quickly dropping glucose levels. On the other hand, consuming foods with a low GI value increase glucose levels slightly and tend to keep you fuller longer.

glycemic chart

A GI of 0-55 is low, 56-69 is medium, and 70-100 is high. Some examples of low GI foods are wholegrain bread, porridge, and oils. A few foods high in GI are baked goods, pasta, and rice. It is important to know your GI because it is a possible indication of your chances of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Eating a low GI diet is linked with reduced chances of getting diabetes, heart disease, acne, obesity and even certain cancers. The following are a few ways you can lower your GI intake.

  • You should aim to eat fresh fruits and vegetables that aren’t starchy such as broccoli and asparagus
  • Try to consume soluble fibers like oats, barley, and chia seeds
  • Consume whole grains that aren’t processed like whole rolled oats
  • Eat balanced meals that are rich in good carbs, protein, and a little bit of good fat

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Blood Sugar & Dementia

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Adapted by Wellsource & Tufts University Study. 
Keeping your blood sugar levels under control is a proven practice to help prevent diabetes. A simple blood test can provide you with important information about your fasting blood sugar level, glucose levels, and your risk for diabetes. But there may be other uses for measuring blood sugar than diabetes alone.A new study of seniors shows that keeping blood sugar levels low can help keep your brain healthy and prevent dementia. The Tufts University study included 2,000 seniors, all free of dementia at the start of the study. After nearly seven years of follow-up, 524 people developed dementia.

Among non-diabetics, those who developed dementia had higher fasting blood sugar levels. Those with higher glucose levels were 20 percent more likely to develop dementia.

Among diabetics, the increase in risk of dementia was even higher – 40 percent higher in those with higher blood sugar levels.

Whether you’re diabetic or not, adopting a lifestyle to help control blood sugar levels is good for the brain and may help you avoid developing dementia.

Here are three proven ways to lower your blood sugar:

1. Maintain a healthy weight. If you are overweight, even losing 10 to 15 pounds can help lower blood sugar levels.

2. Get regular aerobic exercise such as brisk walking for 30-plus minutes daily. The exercise helps burn up extra sugar in the blood in both diabetics and non-diabetics.

3. Choose healthy meals – high in fiber from whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and legumes. Eat foods low in saturated fat and cholesterol, and limit red meats and high-fat dairy products. Follow a low-glycemic diet by avoiding soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages and snacks. And limit potatoes, white bread, white rice, and other refined grains.

If you are a diabetic, you should monitor your blood sugar levels daily and adopt healthy lifestyle habits to prevent complications from this disease. Your doctor may also adjust your medications to keep blood sugar levels in a healthy range, as measured by an A1C level of less than 7 percent.

Source: Tufts University.

 


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